April 2017 Digital Edition

Click Here

March 2017 Digital Edition

Click Here

Feb. 2017 Digital Edition

Click Here

Nov/Dec 2016 Digital Edition

Click Here

Oct 2016 Digital Edition

Click Here

Technology Sectors

Market Sectors

Today's News

NEC Announces Expanded Footprint in Washington, D.C. Opening of Government Relations Office Adds Focus and Support to Global Technology Leader's Safety and Security Customers

Tokyo, Japan & Irving, Texas – NEC Corporation (NEC; TSE: 6701) and NEC Corporation of America (NECAM), an industry leading provider of biometrics and communications technology and integrator of IT solutions, today announced the expansion of its offices in Washington, D.C., to include a new government relations function.    

The office will be responsible for understanding U.S. government requirements for areas such as effective border management and counterterrorism as part of assuring NEC innovation and R&D are aligned to the needs of the United States. The office will also seek to improve NEC's brand awareness throughout the D.C. area.

The new government relations office will be led by Shinsuke (Shin) Takahashi, current Chairman and former President and CEO of NECAM.  In this role, Mr. Takahashi will further strengthen NEC's relationships with government agencies by aligning NEC's strategic initiatives with the goals of the U.S. government. Specific areas of collaboration will focus on security policy, international trade and other matters that affect national safety and security.

NECAM first opened its sales office in Washington, D.C., in May 2016 with a focus on providing biometric security solutions to the U.S. government.  In a short time, NEC has expanded its federal government business, where NEC was selected to participate in the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Biometric Exit pilot program using NEC's NeoFace® Express face recognition rapid matching technology.

"In my previous role as President and CEO of NECAM over the past five years, it was exciting to be part of our growth in the U.S. government," said Mr. Takahashi. "My aim as Head of Government Relations is not only to advance our business, but to collaborate and build relationships in Washington so that we can contribute to a safer, more secure society."

In addition to the office's focus on U.S. government issues, Mr. Takahashi will also be responsible for developing relationships with international organizations like World Bank, IDB, and the United Nations. NEC's expansion in Washington D.C. will become effective in early December.  

Smiths Detection Receives Order for Vehicle Scanning Technologies From U.S. Customs and Border Protection

Edgewood, MD –  Smiths Detection Inc. (SDI) announces orders totaling $7.1 million for HCVM e35 NA and ScanVan technologies under existing indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity (IDIQ) contracts with U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP).

Smiths Detection’s ScanVan is a small, easily maneuvered vehicle, fitted with HI-SCAN 100100T technology, a state-of-the-art X-ray system capable of scanning objects such as cargo, strollers, boxes or electronics. It is specially designed for the needs of customs facilities, airports, transport operators, and couriers - or wherever temporary high-security checkpoints are required.

The HCVM e35 NA is a fully integrated mobile solution used to inspect whole trucks, containers and vehicles. Utilizing state-of-the-art software platforms to provide detailed X-ray image views, customizable image options, and comparison tools to enhance screening outcome, it screens for contraband and threats such as explosives, narcotics, and weapons. The solutions also help operators to reduce screening times and increase data collection capability.  

Stephen Esposito, Vice President of Business Development and Sales, said, “Smiths Detection’s advanced technology, reputation for custom solutions, responsiveness, and reliable service  have helped us to become long-term providers for agencies around the world. Our experience allows us to continue to work closely with CBP to provide world-leading solutions that help to protect our borders and secure locations across the country.”

For more information, please visit www.smithsdetection.com

###

Avinor Oslo Airport Expands its Qognify Security Solution With Situator

Qognify, the leader in big data solutions for physical security and operations, today announced that it has recently expanded its security solution at Gardermoen Oslo Airport with Situator, the company's market-leading situation management solution. Avinor, the group responsible for managing Norway's airports, decided to not only expand and upgrade Oslo Airport, but unify its different systems to create a unified security platform.
Extending to Situation Management

A Qognify video management solution user since 2008, the Airport, with the support of Racom, Qognify's partner, the airport now added Situator Situation Management solution. The comprehensive platform integrates all existing systems - Qognify and third-party, including thousands of surveillance cameras, access control and other sensors. Situator structures and correlates the information from these different systems for greater situational awareness, incident management and effective response.
Flexigate override support
Being a major European airport, Oslo serves many Schengen flights, meaning flights to the 26 European countries that have officially abolished passport and all other types of border control at their borders. Allowing the area to function as a single country for international travel purposes dictates special operational requirements using advanced Flexigate system. The Flexigate system avoids incidents where the wrong doors are opened to ensure that passengers who should go through the border control actually do so. Situator integrates with the advanced Flexigate access control system, and overrides switching of gates between Schengen and non-Schengen flights, as well as the domestic flights if the control systems are out of operations.
Avinor Oslo Airport: "Situator allows us to leverage our existing technology, and extend the capabilities of those systems for increased value. Our long-term partnership with Racom and Qognify has given us the ability to smartly and cost-effectively upgrade our security without having to rip & replace previous, viable investments."
"Adding Qognify Situator to the security and operations program at Oslo Airport has enabled us to confidently build true best-of-breed solution," said Frode Igland, CEO, Racom AS. "The new capabilities provide a common operating picture for all stakeholders, improving security and operations."
"Oslo Airport's security program is one of the most advanced ones among the many airports we are involved in," commented Moti Shabtai, Qognify's CEO & President. "Our partnership with Avinor and Racom is a testament to how deep, long-term collaboration can produce exceptional return on investment for the airport."
About Racom
Racom is a privately owned Norwegian company providing intelligent technology solutions with value added professional services. Our mission is to optimize operations, security, safety, network and communication to critical infrastructure and critical community functions, for the purpose of facilitating to future needs.
http://www.racom.no
About Qognify
Qognify helps organizations mitigate risk, maintain business continuity, and optimize operations. The Qognify portfolio includes video management, video and data analytics, and PSIM/ Situation Management solutions that are deployed in financial institutions, transportation agencies, airports, seaports, utility companies, city centers, and to secure many of the world's highest-profile public events.
http://www.Qognify.com

Coast Guard offloads approximately 10 tons of cocaine in Port Everglades

MIAMI — The crew of the Coast Guard Cutter Spencer offloaded approximately 10 tons of cocaine and 23 kilograms of heroin Tuesday in Port Everglades worth an estimated $300 million wholesale seized in international waters off the Eastern Pacific Ocean.

The drugs were interdicted along Mexico and Central America by multiple U.S. Coast Guard cutters.

The offload represents 14 separate, suspected drug smuggling vessel interdictions by the Coast Guard:

    The CGC Steadfast was responsible for one case, seizing an estimated 940 kilograms of cocaine
    The CGC James was responsible for two cases, seizing an estimated 690 kilograms of cocaine
    The CGC Alert  was responsible for six cases, seizing an estimated 3,305 kilograms of cocaine and 23 kilograms of heroin
    The CGC Aspen was responsible for one case, seizing an estimated 102 kilograms of cocaine
    The CGC Vigorous  was responsible for one case, seizing an estimated 1,150 kilograms of cocaine
    The CGC Spencer was responsible for two cases, seizing an estimated 3,000 kilograms of cocaine
    The CGC Thetis was responsible for one case, seizing an estimated 1,060 kilograms of cocaine

Numerous U.S. agencies from the Departments of Defense, Justice and Homeland Security are involved in the effort to combat transnational organized crime. The Coast Guard, Navy, Customs and Border Protection, FBI, Drug Enforcement Agency, and Immigration and Customs Enforcement along with allied and international partner agencies play a role in counter-drug operations. The fight against transnational organized crime networks in the Eastern Pacific requires unity of effort in all phases from detection, monitoring and interdictions, to prosecutions by U.S. Attorneys in California, on the East Coast, and in the Caribbean.

"This offload today is not just the result of one unit, but the combined efforts of multiple Coast Guard cutters, aircraft and support, as well as that of our partners and allied men and women who continue to work day and night to stop these criminal organizations from profiting off transnational crime and smuggling," said Cdr. John Mctamney, Commanding Officer Coast Guard Cutter Spencer. "While this offload represents approximately 10 tons of illicit drugs that will never hit out streets, it also represents a significant depletion to the cash flow to these criminal organizations."

The Coast Guard increased U.S. and allied presence in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and Caribbean Basin, which are known drug transit zones off of Central and South America, as part of its Western Hemisphere Strategy. During at-sea interdictions in international waters, a suspect vessel is initially located and tracked by allied, military or law enforcement personnel. The interdictions, including the actual boarding, are led and conducted by U.S. Coast Guardsmen. The law enforcement phase of counter-smuggling operations in the Eastern Pacific are conducted under the authority of the 11th Coast Guard District headquartered in Alameda, California.

The cutter Steadfast is a 210-foot medium-endurance cutter homeported in Astoria, Oregon. The cutter James is a 418-foot national security cutter homeported in Charleston, South Carolina. The cutter Alert is a 210-foot medium-endurance cutter homeported in Astoria, Oregon. The cutter Aspen is a 225-foot buoy tender homeported in San Francisco, California. The cutter Vigorous is a 210-foot medium-endurance cutter homeported in Virginia Beach, Virginia. The cutter Spencer is a 270-foot medium-endurance cutter homeported in Boston, Massachusetts. The cutter Thetis is a 270-foot medium-endurance cutter homeported in Key West, Florida.

XLIVE 2017 Convenes with U.S. Dept. of Homeland Security, Las Vegas Police Dept., Intellitix + More to Address Security at Live Events and Festivals in Las Vegas

LAS VEGAS, Nov. 14, 2017 -- As live events and festivals are more prevalent than ever across the globe, the ability to keep attendees, creators and artists safe at these events remains the highest priority. Confronting potential security issues head on and offering up solutions to event producers, the directors of leading live event and festival conference XLIVE have gathered the top experts in Safety and Security to preside over a selection of workshops and panels geared specifically towards keeping events as safe as possible.

Inviting festival producers, event organizers and venue operators to explore a comprehensive program composed of case studies, roundtable discussions and panels, the primary goal of XLIVE is to deliver an educational platform where participants will learn how to identify key vulnerabilities and deploy methodologies to ensure safe and successful events. Participants of the safety and security activations at the conference will have direct access to interact with representatives from leading security companies, including AEG Presents, MSA Security, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Clark County Fire Department, Las Vegas Police Department, Intellitix, Unified Command plus many others.

CEO & Co-Founder of XLIVE, Waco Hoover said, "Creating a safe environment for festival attendees is a primary objective for all live event and festival producers. The programming and in-depth workshop at XLIVE this year will provide a robust set of safety and security resources that participants can immediately take back and implement in their organizations."            

Emphasizing the importance of building a strong core health and safety team in addition to discerning which measures should be in place well ahead of any event, XLIVE's faculty will focus on the establishment and maintenance of safety and security protocols at live events. To address the growing challenges festival executives are facing in the wake of tragic events such as the Ariana Grande concert in Manchester or natural disasters such as hurricanes, XLIVE demonstrates how to wisely invest funds to ensure artists and fans are protected from natural disasters and terrorist threats.

Fundamental learning opportunities include the Safety First - Building Out the Best Health and Safety Team, an informative roundtable discussion with the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, the Clark County Fire Department, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority to examine recent incidents and review strategies that were successful in crisis mitigation and prevention.

Further aiding in the advancement of safety at live events is the 2017 Safety and Security Workshop, a senior-level forum taking place on December 13th that will bring together entertainment and live event executives for a deep dive into all facets of event security. The expansive schedule targets Best Practices, Emergency Planning, Access Control and Credentialing, Surveillance and how to activate support from Federal, State and Local agencies plus an interactive Q&A at the end of the workshop to address singular queries. The Safety and Security Workshop will be led by driving forces on the international security circuit, with companies such as AEG Presents, MSA Security, Unified Command, Intellitix, Event Risk Management Solutions LLC and the Venue Solutions Group.

Among pivotal figures involved with the Safety and Security Workshop is Jeff Miller, SVP MSA Security, whose strong background covers Entertainment and Sports Venue Security, Crisis Communications, Explosive Detection K9, SmartTech, Investigations, Social Media Intelligence, Cyber Security and Executive Protection. Jeff Miller's resume includes former Chief Security Office for the National Football League and a 24-year long career with the Pennsylvania State Police, retiring as Commissioner in 2008. Also on board for the security workshop is AEG Present's Ashour Ebrahim, Director of Festival Health & Safety, who will bring a wealth of knowledge to the workshop and whose background covers Human Intelligence Development, Foreign Travel Security and Operations, Executive & Dignitary Protection, Specialized Security Services, Law Enforcement & Military Tactics Training, Site Security, Threat & Vulnerability Assessments, plus Threat and Risk Mitigation. Jeff Miller and Ashour Ebrahim will be joined by several other experts to consult in areas such as venue protection, major event security and crisis communications. More information on this critical seminar available here.

Hexagon Safety & Infrastructure Unveils Safe City Framework Integrated solutions and coordinated capabilities make cities safer and more resilient

HUNTSVILLE, Ala., Nov. 14, 2017 -- Hexagon Safety & Infrastructure unveiled its Safe City Framework at Smart City Expo World Congress, the leading international event for smart cities. Hexagon's Safe City Framework offers flexibility to support solutions that advance capabilities, while being practical to implement within a city's new or existing information and communications technology (ICT) infrastructure.

Hexagon has been independently assessed as the global market leader for computer-aided dispatch (CAD) and geographic information system (GIS) software in control rooms and offers an extensive portfolio of solutions and domain expertise for other vital public services. Hexagon's integrated solutions and coordinated capabilities amplify the benefits and impact of individual software applications to improve public services operations, increase citywide cooperation and expand stakeholder engagement.

"Cities must not only protect people and property, but also economic activity, the environment and the public perception of the city as a safe place to live, work and visit," said Steven Cost, president, Hexagon Safety & Infrastructure. "Hexagon provides the connectivity, collaboration and intelligence essential to making cities safer and more resilient."

Hexagon's solutions serve thousands of communities around the world, from mega cities like New York City and São Paulo to entire countries, like Germany and New Zealand. Supported by an extensive technology and implementation partner eco-system, and with safe city-ready components that advance city capabilities, Hexagon is uniquely positioned to realize customers' safe city strategies.

These safe city components and capabilities include:

Data mining and analytics solutions that help identify and mitigate risk and improve resource management and operational efficiency.
Sensor and video intelligence solutions that improve operational capability to detect, assess and respond to incidents.
Citizen reporting solutions that improve the ease and speed with which the public can request assistance and provide information.
Next Gen 911/112 call-taking and dispatching solutions that manage communications and critical information from multimedia sources and coordinate and track resources and situations in real time.
Multi-agency resource management solutions that provide the information and capabilities to optimize resources across services and jurisdictions.
Infrastructure management solutions that optimize planning and operations to better understand the condition of assets, minimize disruption to vital services and expedite recovery.
Incident command system solutions that enable collaboration between emergency services and other city services for faster, more efficient and effective major incident planning, response, recovery and mitigation.
Mobile working solutions that empower personnel and increase situational awareness, while enhancing efficiency and service delivery.
Digital records and evidence solutions that collect and manage information about people, places and incidents to aid evidence-based investigations and decision-making.
Dashboards and reporting solutions that make information accessible, interactive and fact-based for greater insight, visibility and engagement.
During Smart City Expo World Congress, Hexagon is demonstrating how its portfolio works across three areas essential to every smart city: digital, safe and connected. Hexagon will demonstrate its safe city capabilities in its own exhibit area, as well as alongside its partners Microsoft and Huawei, while Cost will speak of the challenges facing urban areas during the panel discussion, "Bend Not Break: Preparing Our Cities to Respond to Emergencies and Disasters."

About Hexagon Safety & Infrastructure

Hexagon Safety & Infrastructure provides mission-critical and business-critical solutions to governments and service providers. A global leader, proven innovator and trusted partner, our software and industry expertise help improve the lives of millions of people through safer communities, better public services and more reliable infrastructure. Visit www.hexagonsafetyinfrastructure.com.

Hexagon Safety & Infrastructure is part of Hexagon (Nasdaq Stockholm: HEXA B; hexagon.com), a leading global provider of information technologies that drive productivity and quality across geospatial and industrial enterprise applications.

©2017 Intergraph Corporation d/b/a Hexagon Safety & Infrastructure. Hexagon Safety & Infrastructure is part of Hexagon. All rights reserved. Hexagon Safety & Infrastructure and the Hexagon Safety & Infrastructure logo are trademarks of Hexagon or its subsidiaries in the United States and in other countries.

SOURCE Hexagon Safety & Infrastructure

Related Links

http://www.hexagonsafetyinfrastructure.com

NASA is "SIRIUS" About Its Analog Missions:The SIRIUS missions are the latest spaceflight analogs NASA is utilizing to help us understand the risks of travel further into the solar system.

HOUSTON, TX, November 09, 2017 -- Before humans will go to Mars, NASA has practice missions on Earth. The SIRIUS missions are the latest spaceflight analogs NASA is utilizing to help us understand the risks of travel further into the solar system. This ground-based analog is a complement to human research being conducted on the International Space Station, such as Scott Kelly's One-Year Mission. These missions are paving the way to learn how the human body reacts in unique environments.

An analog environment is a situation on Earth that produces effects on the body similar to those experienced in space, physically, mentally and emotionally. These studies are expected to help advance human spaceflight from lower-Earth orbit missions into deep space exploration. NASA is associated with at least 15 analog environments throughout the world. The SIRIUS analog takes place at the Institute for Bio-Medical Problems (IBMP) in Russia. Other NASA-associated analogs are in Germany, Canada, Antarctica, and at sites in the United States.

The SIRIUS (Scientific International Research In a Unique terrestrial Station) missions are the first time NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) partners with Russia's IBMP Ground-based Experimental Complex (NEK) to conduct a series of analog missions. The first of these missions is SIRIUS-17, named because of its 17-day duration and it will take place in 2017. The mission is to begin on Nov. 7.

"The SIRIUS-17 mission, from a NASA perspective, is designed to test the capabilities of the Russian facility," said Lisa Spence, Flight Analogs Program Manager. "We want to exercise the facility capabilities, mission planning and integration procedures to identify challenges or issues now as opposed to during a longer duration mission."

The goal is for NASA to work with the IBMP to conduct at least three follow-on missions: a four-month mission in 2018, an eight-month mission in 2019, and a 12-month mission in 2020.

SIRIUS-17 will have six human participants who will be isolated and confined in a mock-spacecraft habitat for the mission's duration. During the mission, they will be performing a suite of scientific experiments. Training for the crew began the week of Oct. 9.

One of the reason NASA chose the Russian facility is that it is a dedicated facility. This means that during the mission, its purpose is to execute the simulated space missions and research activities targeted for an isolation environment, according to Spence. "Also, they have done successful long-duration isolation missions at the IBMP facility in the past, even up to 520 days. They have demonstrated the ability to do the type of missions we are planning to work up to," she said.

More than 40 scientific experiments have been selected for SIRIUS-17, which will place significant demands on crew time. HRP personnel developed a unified science requirements document, which helps in the development of the mission timeline, and maximizes the science data capture.

NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) is dedicated to discovering the best methods and technologies to support safe, productive human space travel. HRP enables space exploration by reducing the risks to astronaut health and performance using ground research facilities, the International Space Station, and analog environments. This leads to the development and delivery of a program focused on: human health, performance, and habitability standards; countermeasures and risk mitigation solutions; and advanced habitability and medical support technologies. HRP supports innovative, scientific human research by funding more than 300 research grants to respected universities, hospitals and NASA centers to over 200 researchers in more than 30 states.

Monica Edwards
Laurie Abadie
NASA Human Research Strategic Communications

Environmental Assessment of Proposed Tracer Particle and Biological Releases for the Hazards of Dynamic Outdoor Release (HODOR) Project

Oct. 2017, This Environmental Assessment (EA) documents the analysis of the potential effects of a proposal by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science & Technology Directorate (S&T) to conduct tests during January/February 2018 and then again during June/July, 2018 involving the release of low concentrations of particles at two buildings within the Chilocco Indian Agricultural School (Chilocco campus) in Newkirk, Kay County, OK. The S&T program is entitled the Hazards of Dynamic Outdoor Releases (HODOR). No construction, permanent land disturbance, or land use changes would occur with implementation of the Proposed Action or the Alternatives.
The HODOR program supports DHS’s strategic goals to detect and recover from biological attacks and inform and support biodefense planning, response, and restoration, particularly in consequence/risk assessment modeling of the indoor hazards posed by outdoor aerosols. Characterizing the impact of biological weapons on infrastructure is a key element to achieving this goal. One indicator of a building’s ability to withstand the effects of a biological weapon is the building protection factor (BPF). The BPF is the degree to which a building’s occupants are protected from biological materials as compared to a person located outside the building. Dispersion models have been created to help in these endeavors and are actively used by agencies within DHS for both pre- and post-attack planning. Pre-attack planning includes identifying strategies for response in the event of a biological attack. Post-attack planning includes determining the source location for attribution, identifying exposed people, and aiding the remediation effort (e.g., mapping, decontamination). While the dispersion models are critically important for homeland defense, the lack of quantitative evidence and understanding of the BPF is a significant gap. Selection of specific buildings that are representative of U.S. construction for homes and apartments was conducted to support this effort. This EA is being conducted in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) in 40 CFR 1500- 1508, and DHS Directive 023-01, Implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act. In support of these tests, aerosol biologists from Sandia National Laboratory, aerosol engineers from the National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center (NBACC), scientists from the OSU-University Multispectral Laboratories (UML), and other supporting state and federal agencies have partnered for the proposed testing. The assembled team has conducted a thorough review of available literature to assess the potential for environmental hazards associated with the proposed program. Specifically, an analysis of alternatives was conducted to select appropriate buildings for testing, best inert materials, and optimal biological material for release to successfully meet program objectives.
Buildings to be used for testing were selected based on the DHS-desired characteristics, as well as the ability to release materials at a distance from these buildings that minimize environmental impact and public exposure.
Action alternatives were considered for testing location and testing materials. A total of five abandoned residential and apartment buildings within the Chilocco campus were evaluated against two main criteria: conformance to typical US building standards; and potential testing obstructions (e.g. vegetation, proximity to other buildings).
Residential Building Alternative 1 (Building 53) and Residential Building Alternative 2 (Building 56) both contain numerous vegetation and building obstructions and would require major renovations to meet current typical building standards. Residential Building Alternative 3 (Building 58) has the fewest number of potentially obscuring structures and required minor renovations.
Apartment Building Alternative 1 (Building 10) did not realistically represent current apartment building design or utilize standard heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Apartment Building Alternative 2 (Building 60), more realistically simulated a typical apartment structure with multiple HVAC systems, thus allowing more accurate testing conditions. The No Action Building Alternative would result in no real-world testing scenario, and would not meet the stated purpose and need.
The use of inert particulate materials provides extremely valuable information toward the overall objectives of the HODOR program. Inert materials will be used to monitor gross particle movement around and into each building, in real time, using relatively simple and straightforward sensors. The data collected with inert particle materials will be used to optimize sensor placement for subsequent biological particulate releases. Two different inert particulates were selected to be employed for use in gross characterization of particle penetration into buildings. Alternative Inert Particle 1 would utilize titanium dioxide (TiO2), a white odorless powder that is chemically insoluble in water, nonreactive, nonflammable, and nonhazardous. This material is not regulated or defined as a toxic or hazardous material.
Alternative Inert Particle 2 is a 90:10% mixture of urea powder with CL Fluorescent Brightener 220. Urea serves an important role in the metabolism of nitrogen-containing compounds by animals and is the main nitrogen-containing substance in the urine of mammals. CL Fluorescent Brightener 220 is a finishing reagent in textiles, and up to 2% by weight in laundry detergents.
Both aerosol particulates would be released and detected by sensors located outside and inside the preferred buildings. At the concentrations resulting from the proposed releases, all materials are considered nontoxic and nonhazardous. The No Action Alternative would result in no release of aerosol particulates. This alternative would result in possible missed biological sensors detections, reducing the likelihood of program success. In addition, it would increase the number of barcoded biological material releases and would require additional labor to decontaminate each site between releases. These factors would increase both programmatic cost and time and is not a preferred alternative.
To understand the true detection capabilities of the biological sensor, challenge tests with a material must be performed. Since a portion of the technologies rely on the detection of genetic or proteinaceous materials to positively identify a particular threat agent, the simulant must be of biological origin. Three alternatives were considered in order to evaluate tradeoffs in test procedures, which would either partially meet the needs of DHS S&T; additionally there is a no action alternative, which would involve no particulate releases.
Alternative Biological Particulate 1 would employ the use of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp kurstaki (Btk) barcoded spores, which are the preferred biological material to be employed for sensitive characterization of building penetration. Native Btk, sold under the commercial name of Dipel, is used extensively as a bioinsecticide and is not considered a hazard by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) when handled appropriately. The barcoded variant provides much more specific detection and identification from background than the native organism, as it contains a genetic barcode that does not affect any physiological function or phenotypic expression of the organism. It will be dispersed in a similar manner to that of native Btk when used as an insecticide. However, release will be at much lower concentrations than typical insecticidal application rates. The use of the barcoded Btk has been approved for use in this program by the State of Oklahoma’s Department of Agriculture, Food, & Forestry.
Alternative Biological Particulate 2 would utilize native Btk, without barcoding. Native Btk is an approved biopesticide under the commercial name of Dipel. This alternative would require much more time and labor to execute. Alternative Biological Particulate 3 would employ a tagged, inert, fluorescent particle known as DNATrax. The safety of DNATrax particles cannot be assumed, therefore, its use presented unknown risks not conducive to testing objectives. The release of all three biological particulate alternatives would result in slow application rates and low concentrations. No Action Biological Particulate Alternative would still allow the primary objectives of the tests to be met through use of inert particles only, but would require larger quantities of inert powder to overcome the natural background of particulates internal and external to the building. In order to simulate real world data that more closely matches, releases of an actual biological nature is needed.
The Chilocco campus and surrounding land is under the ownership of the Council of Confederated Chilocco Tribes (CCCT) which include the Kaw Nation, the Otoe-Missouria Tribe, the Pawnee Nation, the Ponca Nation, and the Tonkawa Tribe. The campus is abandoned, thus reducing the risk of potential human health and safety risks posed by the presence of sensitive populations. S&T and UML have been in communication with the Bureau of Indian Affairs and CCCT and have determined that the implementation of the preferred alternatives has no adverse impact on resources, human health or the environment.
The direct, indirect, and cumulative environmental effects caused by the potential exposure of terrestrial wildlife, vegetation, water resources, and air quality by movement of the material by any of the alternatives would not have an adverse effect. This is due to both selection of the test materials and limited quantity that will be used. The Chilocco campus is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Consultation with the appropriate Tribal Historic Preservation Officers has been initiated, and no adverse effect is anticipated.
This EA details the approach and reasoning the team would employ to minimize environmental impacts. As can been seen in the body of this document, the buildings to be used, their location, the release locations and the amounts and types of materials to be used all serve to
minimize impact to the surrounding environment. S&T has determined that the proposed testing would have no potential for significant impact on the human environment and that an environmental impact statement is not needed.

 

Executive Summary, Prepared for Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate

Environmental Assessment of Proposed Tracer Particle and Biological Releases for the Hazards of Dynamic Outdoor Release (HODOR) Project

Prepared for Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate

Executive Summary
This Environmental Assessment (EA) documents the analysis of the potential effects of a proposal by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science & Technology Directorate (S&T) to conduct tests during January/February 2018 and then again during June/July, 2018 involving the release of low concentrations of particles at two buildings within the Chilocco Indian Agricultural School (Chilocco campus) in Newkirk, Kay County, OK. The S&T program is entitled the Hazards of Dynamic Outdoor Releases (HODOR). No construction, permanent land disturbance, or land use changes would occur with implementation of the Proposed Action or the Alternatives.
The HODOR program supports DHS’s strategic goals to detect and recover from biological attacks and inform and support biodefense planning, response, and restoration, particularly in consequence/risk assessment modeling of the indoor hazards posed by outdoor aerosols. Characterizing the impact of biological weapons on infrastructure is a key element to achieving this goal. One indicator of a building’s ability to withstand the effects of a biological weapon is the building protection factor (BPF). The BPF is the degree to which a building’s occupants are protected from biological materials as compared to a person located outside the building. Dispersion models have been created to help in these endeavors and are actively used by agencies within DHS for both pre- and post-attack planning. Pre-attack planning includes identifying strategies for response in the event of a biological attack. Post-attack planning includes determining the source location for attribution, identifying exposed people, and aiding the remediation effort (e.g., mapping, decontamination). While the dispersion models are critically important for homeland defense, the lack of quantitative evidence and understanding of the BPF is a significant gap. Selection of specific buildings that are representative of U.S. construction for homes and apartments was conducted to support this effort. This EA is being conducted in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) in 40 CFR 1500- 1508, and DHS Directive 023-01, Implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act. In support of these tests, aerosol biologists from Sandia National Laboratory, aerosol engineers from the National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center (NBACC), scientists from the OSU-University Multispectral Laboratories (UML), and other supporting state and federal agencies have partnered for the proposed testing. The assembled team has conducted a thorough review of available literature to assess the potential for environmental hazards associated with the proposed program. Specifically, an analysis of alternatives was conducted to select appropriate buildings for testing, best inert materials, and optimal biological material for release to successfully meet program objectives.


Buildings to be used for testing were selected based on the DHS-desired characteristics, as well as the ability to release materials at a distance from these buildings that minimize environmental impact and public exposure.
Action alternatives were considered for testing location and testing materials. A total of five abandoned residential and apartment buildings within the Chilocco campus were evaluated
against two main criteria: conformance to typical US building standards; and potential testing obstructions (e.g. vegetation, proximity to other buildings).


Residential Building Alternative 1 (Building 53) and Residential Building Alternative 2 (Building 56) both contain numerous vegetation and building obstructions and would require major renovations to meet current typical building standards. Residential Building Alternative 3 (Building 58) has the fewest number of potentially obscuring structures and required minor renovations.


Apartment Building Alternative 1 (Building 10) did not realistically represent current apartment building design or utilize standard heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Apartment Building Alternative 2 (Building 60), more realistically simulated a typical apartment structure with multiple HVAC systems, thus allowing more accurate testing conditions. The No Action Building Alternative would result in no real-world testing scenario, and would not meet the stated purpose and need.


The use of inert particulate materials provides extremely valuable information toward the overall objectives of the HODOR program. Inert materials will be used to monitor gross particle movement around and into each building, in real time, using relatively simple and straightforward sensors. The data collected with inert particle materials will be used to optimize sensor placement for subsequent biological particulate releases. Two different inert particulates were selected to be employed for use in gross characterization of particle penetration into buildings. Alternative Inert Particle 1 would utilize titanium dioxide (TiO2), a white odorless powder that is chemically insoluble in water, nonreactive, nonflammable, and nonhazardous. This material is not regulated or defined as a toxic or hazardous material.


Alternative Inert Particle 2 is a 90:10% mixture of urea powder with CL Fluorescent Brightener 220. Urea serves an important role in the metabolism of nitrogen-containing compounds by animals and is the main nitrogen-containing substance in the urine of mammals. CL Fluorescent Brightener 220 is a finishing reagent in textiles, and up to 2% by weight in laundry detergents.


Both aerosol particulates would be released and detected by sensors located outside and inside the preferred buildings. At the concentrations resulting from the proposed releases, all materials are considered nontoxic and nonhazardous. The No Action Alternative would result in no release of aerosol particulates. This alternative would result in possible missed biological sensors detections, reducing the likelihood of program success. In addition, it would increase the number of barcoded biological material releases and would require additional labor to decontaminate each site between releases. These factors would increase both programmatic cost and time and is not a preferred alternative.


To understand the true detection capabilities of the biological sensor, challenge tests with a material must be performed. Since a portion of the technologies rely on the detection of genetic or proteinaceous materials to positively identify a particular threat agent, the simulant must be of biological origin. Three alternatives were considered in order to evaluate tradeoffs in test procedures, which would either partially meet the needs of DHS S&T; additionally there is a no action alternative, which would involve no particulate releases.
Alternative Biological Particulate 1 would employ the use of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp kurstaki (Btk) barcoded spores, which are the preferred biological material to be employed for sensitive characterization of building penetration. Native Btk, sold under the commercial name of Dipel, is used extensively as a bioinsecticide and is not considered a hazard by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) when handled appropriately. The barcoded variant provides much more specific detection and identification from background than the native organism, as it contains a genetic barcode that does not affect any physiological function or phenotypic expression of the organism. It will be dispersed in a similar manner to that of native Btk when used as an insecticide. However, release will be at much lower concentrations than typical insecticidal application rates. The use of the barcoded Btk has been approved for use in this program by the State of Oklahoma’s Department of Agriculture, Food, & Forestry.


Alternative Biological Particulate 2 would utilize native Btk, without barcoding. Native Btk is an approved biopesticide under the commercial name of Dipel. This alternative would require much more time and labor to execute. Alternative Biological Particulate 3 would employ a tagged, inert, fluorescent particle known as DNATrax. The safety of DNATrax particles cannot be assumed, therefore, its use presented unknown risks not conducive to testing objectives. The release of all three biological particulate alternatives would result in slow application rates and low concentrations. No Action Biological Particulate Alternative would still allow the primary objectives of the tests to be met through use of inert particles only, but would require larger quantities of inert powder to overcome the natural background of particulates internal and external to the building. In order to simulate real world data that more closely matches, releases of an actual biological nature is needed.
The Chilocco campus and surrounding land is under the ownership of the Council of Confederated Chilocco Tribes (CCCT) which include the Kaw Nation, the Otoe-Missouria Tribe, the Pawnee Nation, the Ponca Nation, and the Tonkawa Tribe. The campus is abandoned, thus reducing the risk of potential human health and safety risks posed by the presence of sensitive populations. S&T and UML have been in communication with the Bureau of Indian Affairs and CCCT and have determined that the implementation of the preferred alternatives has no adverse impact on resources, human health or the environment.


The direct, indirect, and cumulative environmental effects caused by the potential exposure of terrestrial wildlife, vegetation, water resources, and air quality by movement of the material by any of the alternatives would not have an adverse effect. This is due to both selection of the test materials and limited quantity that will be used. The Chilocco campus is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Consultation with the appropriate Tribal Historic Preservation Officers has been initiated, and no adverse effect is anticipated.
This EA details the approach and reasoning the team would employ to minimize environmental impacts. As can been seen in the body of this document, the buildings to be used, their location, the release locations and the amounts and types of materials to be used all serve to minimize impact to the surrounding environment. S&T has determined that the proposed testing would have no potential for significant impact on the human environment and that an environmental impact statement is not needed.

Lockheed Martin Honors Two Wounded Army Veterans through Scholarship Program

FORT WORTH, Texas, Nov. 13, 2017 -- Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) announced Staff Sgt. Robert Bartlett and Staff Sgt. Jay Fondren as the recipients of the 2017 Lockheed Martin Fighting Spirit Scholarship. For the second consecutive year Lockheed Martin has sponsored the scholarship program, an initiative providing wounded veterans opportunities to experience flying and sailing through two nonprofit organizations, Warrior Sailing Program and Able Flight.

 

"The Fighting Spirit Scholarship program is an opportunity for Lockheed Martin to directly support the warfighters who embody extraordinary courage and sacrifice," said Orlando Carvalho, executive vice president of Lockheed Martin Aeronautics. "This program is intended to enhance the professional and personal growth of two individuals who represent the mission of the program and the mission of those who serve and defend our great nation."

Able Flight selected U.S. Army veteran Staff Sgt. Robert Bartlett who was critically injured in Iraq in 2005 when his Humvee was struck by an explosive projectile, causing injuries to his face and hands, and the loss of one eye. After completing Able Flight's six-week flight school, held at Purdue University's Department of Aviation Technology, Bartlett will receive a pilot's license and earn his wings during a presentation at the EAA AirVenture Oshkosh airshow in July 2018.


"Words could never express my gratitude for the actions that Lockheed Martin has taken to help me and my family," Bartlett said.

 

"The Fighting Spirit Scholarship means hope for a better future for me and always being able to provide for all my family's needs. This scholarship will change my life forever and give me a chance at a new life beyond my wounds."

Warrior Sailing Program selected U.S. Army veteran Staff Sgt. Jay Fondren, a triple-amputee injured in Iraq in 2004 after an improvised explosive device struck his patrol vehicle. Fondren will earn a nationally recognized Basic Keelboat Sailing Certification after successful completion of the Warrior Sailing Program's Basic and Advanced Training programs.

"I feel greatly honored to receive the Fighting Spirit Scholarship," said Fondren. "I hope my example in life will motivate other wounded veterans to live life to the fullest. You can't let your disability keep you from doing what you want to do. You have to find a way to overcome it or get around it, especially when it comes to doing things with your family."

In addition to attending the training programs at no cost, each scholarship recipient and guest receives roundtrip flights to Fort Worth and a tour of the Lockheed Martin F-35 production facility, VIP tickets to the 2017 Lockheed Martin Armed Forces Bowl game and access to other exclusive bowl-related activities.

Both Able Flight and Warrior Sailing Program selected one candidate for the Fighting Spirit Scholarship from the pool of applicants who applied through their respective websites.

Learn more about the stories of Staff Sgt. Robert Bartlett and Staff Sgt. Jay Fondren, and how you can support the veteran community at LockheedMartin.com/FightingSpirit.

About Able Flight
Founded as a nonprofit organization in 2006, Able Flight provides flight training and aviation career training scholarships for people with a variety of physical disabilities, including wounded and disabled veterans. http://ableflight.org/

About Warrior Sailing Program
Warrior Sailing Program is an official program of the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy Sailing Foundation and offers the organizational and technical expertise to create opportunities ranging from introductory level sailing through world sailing competition. Programming is achieved through partnerships and collaborations within the sailing community, military programs and affiliates, with funding from generous supporters. The alliance between these working relationships allows Warrior Sailing Program to stay focused on improving the lives of service members with disabilities and inspiring a new outlook for participants and the communities in which they serve. www.warriorsailing.org

About Lockheed Martin
Headquartered in Bethesda, Maryland, Lockheed Martin is a global security and aerospace company that employs approximately 97,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services.

 

Pages

 

Recent Videos

HID Global is opening the door to a new era of security and convenience.  Powered by Seos technology, the HID Mobile Access solution delivers a more secure and convenient way to open doors and gates, access networks and services, and make cashless payments using phones and other mobile devices. ...
Mobile device forensics can make a difference in many investigations, but you need training that teaches you how to get the most out of your mobile forensics hardware and software, and certifies you to testify in court. Read this white paper to learn how to evaluate mobile forensics training...
PureTech Systems is a software company that develops and markets PureActiv, its geospatial analytics solution designed to protect critical perimeters and infrastructure.  Its patented video analytics leverage thermal cameras, radars and other perimeter sensors to detect, geo-locate, classify, and...
PureTech Systems is a technology leader in the use of geospatial video, focusing on perimeter security.  When combining geospatial capabilities with video analytics and PTZ camera control, managers of critical facilities can benefit by allowing the video management system to aid them in the process...